The Magickal Cinnamon Tree

By Isabella @TheWandCarver

Instagram:  @thewandcarver

Do Cinnamon trees grow in the UK? Yes!  But to my knowledge, not just anywhere but in Birmingham, West Mids at the Birmingham Botanical Gardens, they do. The Cinnamon tree [Cinnamomum verum – which translates to “true Cinnamon] is native to Sri Lanka, however, in 2016, Indonesia and China produced 75% of the world’s supply of cinnamon. The aromatic spice was once one of the most expensive spices to procure in western countries.  Nowadays you can get a small jar of it for under a pound in some shops. 

Cinnamon Trees by beautifulnow.is

Many people love a sprinkle of Cinnamon over their porridge or toast of a morning. Of course, there are also many kinds of drinks, hot or cold, alcohol based or plain, which benefit from the flavour of a bit of Cinnamon.  And it is used in many kinds of curries and other favourite Indian and Middle Eastern foods we all enjoy. And that Cinnamon stick everyone enjoys in a hot Christmas / Yuletide toddy is the bark of the Cinnamon tree! 

According to the website for Birmingham Botanical Gardens:

To make cinnamon sticks or “quills” the stems have to processed soon after harvesting whilst the stems are still wet. Again, the outer bark is removed, then the stems is hammered evenly to loosen the inner bark, which can be separated into 1 metre long rolls, 0.5mm thick. These are dried in a well ventilated, warm area for 4 to 6 hours before being cut into 5 to 10 cm lengths for sale. The cultivated trees are coppiced or cut back to the ground to encourage new stems. This is done on a two-year cycle so that only two-year-old stems are used. Cinnamon can be used to flavour cakes, biscuits, and other deserts as well as curries, stews, soups, meats and pickles. It is also used in drinks like teas and mulled wine for Christmas.”

At first I had thought of writing about Cinnamon the spice in a Wortcunner’s Cabinet blog, however, the more I thought on it, it seems that is what everyone does, and in most instances leaving out the tree altogether.  We would not have the spice if not for the tree, therefore, the tree itself needs some attention.

So, what makes it magickal?

Magick

Burning the wood or the bark in an incense will bring about high vibrations and it is also a good ingredient to use to stimulate your psychic powers.  It is excellent in loose incense for money drawing purposes.  Carry a stick of Cinnamon bark with a piece of paper and an amount you need in your currency written on a piece of paper wrapped round it and then wrap a low denomination bank note around that and tie a piece of string round to hold it all together.  Keep this in your coin purse, wallet, or anywhere you keep money until you receive the money you need. [You can also do this with a piece of Cedar wood].  Cinnamon bark, wood, spice, or oil are all excellent to use for empowering yourself with healing, love, protection, psychic powers, and success.  They can be used in sachets, spell bags, incenses, and infusions.  I have read of some people anointing their currency with Cinnamon oil with great success. 

Correspondences

Planet:  Sun

Zodiac:  Leo

Gender:  Masculine

Element:  Fire

Powers:  Healing, Love, Lust, Protection, Power, Psychic Power, Spirituality, Success, Wealth

Sabbat[s]:  Imbolc, Litha, Yule

DeityEgyptian: Ra, Sekhmet, Greek: Hephaestus, Hestia, Hindu: Agneya, Agni, Celtic: Aed, Brigit, Norse: Glöð, Logi, Roman: Vesta, Vulcan,

Other Names:  Sweet Wood,

Health

In my home growing up, if you had a toothache [as too many did in those days!], if pure Clove oil weren’t around and you had some pure Cinnamon oil available, it would work nearly as well.  However, pure Cinnamon oil should not be used topically on one’s skin.  Generally speaking, I believe it would just be best to drink your Cinnamon and leave the oils to add to loose incenses or smearing on your bank notes. 

Cinnamon is proven to relieve upset tummies, however, if you are pregnant, it is best not to imbibe Cinnamon at all. Otherwise, Cinnamon tea after a meal is said to regulate your blood sugar and aid in digestion.  Cinnamon is a powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory.  It has shown hopeful signs in helping Diabetics by dramatically reducing insulin resistances well as those with heart disease by lowering high blood pressure.  There are studies in effect presently which are looking to prove that Cinnamon may have beneficial effects on neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.

And Cinnamon is also being looked into as a possible candidate for slowing the growth of some cancers, and HIV. 

For a Bit of Fun!

I try not to be very “sell-y” in my blogs, although I do write the occasional blog flogging our wares.  As many of you know, my daughters and I make witchcraft supplies which we sell online but we also make a range of rustic Yule decorations as well. And, as several items are made from Cinnamon wood as well as Cinnamon bark, I would like to share them at this time, if anyone is interested.  You can click here to visit and see all the items we have to offer. Thank you for the indulgence 🙂

Many thanks for reading and to all whom this way wander x

Sources

Birmingham Botanical Gardens

Wikapedia.com

The Encyclopaedia of Magical Herbs by Scott Cunningham

About Isabella

Everything worth knowing, I learned from my Nana. I'm a sixty-four year old cunning woman who practises a solitary English hedgewitch life in as near the old ways as I can. I do not sacrifice small animals, neighbours, nor eat children. I'm more interested in visiting my ancestors on hedgewalks. And, I am owned entirely by my lovely feline companion, Pippa [Lady Philipa Cattington].
This entry was posted in Business, Christmas, Magic, Magickal, magickal trees, Pagan, psychic awareness, spell work, Uncategorized, Wiccan, Witch, Witchcraft, wood, Yule and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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